Frequently Asked Questions

How do I order National Campaign resources?

Use our online store: purchases are 100% secure and your order is received instantlythis is the fastest way to complete your transaction.

By fax: send purchase orders to 202-478-8588, attention "Fulfillment"

By check: please indicate which resources you wish to order and make your check payable to The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 

Mail your check and order to:
The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy
1776 Massachusetts Avenue, Ste 200
Washington, DC 20036 

Please note: The National Campaign does not accept orders by phone. If you have questions about an order, please contact our Office and Fulfillment Coordinator.

I'm very interested in helping prevent teen and unplanned pregnancy. What can I do?

There are a number of ways you can help the national effort to prevent teen and unplanned pregnancy.

Make a Donation

Please consider making a financial contribution to The National Campaign and help us prevent teen pregnancy and unplanned pregnancy among single, young adults.

Join Our Notification Network

Looking for the latest facts and stats? Research on what works? Information for teens and parents? Teen and unplanned pregnancy prevention media messages? Sign up for The National Campaign's EGRAM. 

Participate in The National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

A yearly event in May, the National Day is an online opportunity for teens to take a fun, engaging "quiz" that presents them with several real life scenarios involving sex and asks them to choose a course of action. Get more information about the National Day.

Become a National Day Partner

Show a commitment to preventing teen pregnancy and partner with The National Campaign online.

I'm a teen parent, how can I help?

As a teen parent, you provide a uniquely powerful point of view on the subject of teen pregnancy. Sharing your story with other teens can help them appreciate the challenges of being a teen parent. You may want to contact a local or state teen pregnancy prevention organization to find out how you can become involved in your community. 

Visit StayTeen.org, our website for teens designed to provide information, videos, stories, personal experiences, and advice to young people. We invite you to send us your stories via email to admin@stayteen.org - we may post part of your story.

Is there an organization to prevent teen pregnancy in my area? If not, how do I start one?

Look for sources of support in other organizations around youthe school board, local businesses, health care professionals, the local health, welfare, and education departments, faith leaders, PTAs, youth groups, and reproductive health organizations. Once you have formed a start-up group of core players, you can further awareness of teen pregnancy in your area through information campaigns, educating elected officials, fundraisers, and National Day promotion.

Our State Information section is an excellent way to stay informed of teen pregnancy rates in your state. In this web section, you can explore information about state teen pregnancy rates, including breakdowns by age and race/ethnicity. You can also research related topics, like teen birth rates, state demographics, teen risk behavior, and state activities to prevent teen pregnancy. It lists state contacts that may be helpful in starting a coalition, such as Departments of Health, Education, Labor, and Human Services; Governor's councils; foundations; and governmental and non-governmental organizations dealing with maternal and child health.

Other National Campaign resources available for download or purchase that may be helpful include:

  • Talking Back: What Teens Want Adults to Know About Teen Pregnancy
  • Nine Tips to Help Faith Leaders and Their Communities Address Teen Pregnancy
  • Ten Tips for Parents to Help Their Children Avoid Teen Pregnancy
  • Emerging Answers: New Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy

Are there effective teen pregnancy prevention programs?

The National Campaign is strongly committed to fair, science-based evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs. We have also compiled a database on interventions with evidence of success.

In the battle between abstinence education and comprehensive education, The National Campaign is firmly on the side of science. In 1996, The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy was formed to help address the alarming rate of teen pregnancy in America. From the outset, The National Campaign knew that to make a dent in this problem, it had to be a non-partisan, non-ideological organization that could bridge the fundamental and meaningful value disagreements that exist on the issue. 

The National Campaign publishes research on the fundamental question: What programs/curricula have the best evidence of success? As we have noted in several publications, at present, those programs that discuss both abstinence and the importance of sexually active teens using contraception consistently and carefully have the best evidence of success. See our effective programs databaseEmerging Answers 2007, and What Works.

It is also the case that the majority of the American public do not view abstinence and contraception as competing strategies, but instead as complimentary strategies. See With One Voice. To read more about what the Campaign thinks on this issue, review our Thoughts on Abstinence fact sheet.

 

Does The National Campaign provide funding? How can I get funding?

The National Campaign Fund provides a limited number of grants to support activities that advance the mission of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. For more information on past and current National Campaign grants, please visit The National Campaign Fund webpage.

More resources from The National Campaign on funding are available here.

Other resources include:

  • Most large independent foundations, as well as some family foundations, can be researched on the Foundation Center's website
  • Each state has a community foundation—often more than one—that gives exclusively to that region (i.e., the Santa Fe Community Foundation). The Foundation Center links to the community foundations that service each state. 
  • Businesses and corporations typically give in the areas where their businesses have a presence. When approaching any business for supportwhether it be a small family-owned or a large multinational company—remember that in-kind services are always an option. For further information, visit the Foundation Center's page on corporate giving
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides a Healthy Youth Funding Database that lists current and past sources of school health program funding, including federal categorical cooperative agreements, private-sector funding, block grants, and state revenue funding. 
  • After-school programs can be effective in preventing teen pregnancy. Check out the Finance Project's 2003 report Finding Funding: A Guide to Federal Sources for Out-of-School Time and Community School Initiatives.
  • The White House Community and Faith-Based Initiative provides information on funding sources available to community and faith-based organizations working to address a range of social issues. The website includes information about funding sources specifically geared to at-risk youth.

What does The National Campaign do to help prevent teen and unplanned pregnancy?

The About Us section of our website provides a thorough description of The National Campaign, describes our leadership, and discusses how we address the challenge of reducing teen and unplanned pregnancy. 

How can I contact a spokesperson from The National Campaign?

Visit the Campaign's Press Room for more information on different spokespeople at The National Campaign and on how to contact our Communications department or visit our Speaker Request form to request a speaker for your event.

What are the teen pregnancy rates in my state?

Our State Information section is an interactive way to find information about teen pregnancy, teen sexual behavior, and prevention programs state by state.

What are the teen pregnancy rates in my city/county?

Some possible resources include:

Where can I find prior years' rates to see if teen pregnancy is getting better or worse?

For changes over time in state teen pregnancy and birth rates, visit the State Information section on The National Campaign's website.

The Guttmacher Institute also provides state pregnancy rates back to 1985.

Why don't you have more recent statistics?

While some of the statistics on our website may seem out of date, they are almost always the most recent statistics available. Unfortunately, some statisticsnational and state teen pregnancy rates in particulartake a relatively long time to collect.

Birth data are released by the federal government in three waves. Preliminary rates for the previous year are typically released the following summer. Then, final rates are released at the end the following year. Finally, special reports with additional statistics are released on an irregular basis.

Three different national groups release pregnancy data: two branches of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (part of the federal government), and the Guttmacher Institute, a private nonprofit organization.

All three groups release pregnancy data on an irregular basis, and rates are typically 4-6 years behind the current year. This is due in part to the fact that, in addition to birth and miscarriage data, pregnancy data includes abortion data, which is difficult to collectsee The Guttmacher Institute's publication Issues in Brief: The Limitations of U.S. Statistics on Abortion for a discussion of the history and methods of abortion data collection.

Note that most state health departments also release teen pregnancy and/or birth data, and this data is sometimes more recent than data available from national sources. We rarely use this data for two reasons. First, rates are calculated differently in each state, so data cannot be compared across states or with national rates. Second, each state has a different schedule of releasing data, making it difficult to stay current with all 50 states.

Data on sexual activity and contraceptive use usually come from one of three government-funded surveys. Statistics for high school students usually come from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), which takes place every other year. For the most recent data, visit our state information section and go to the teen risk behavior subsection.
The National Campaign announces when new data are released through The National Campaign EGRAM. If you'd like to be notified of new data and National Campaign updates, sign up for the E-GRAM here.

Can you explain what these statistics meanin plain English?

The most common statistic on our website is a rate, either a teen pregnancy rate or a teen birth rate. A rate measures the likelihood of teen pregnancy or birth happening within the population and is calculated by dividing the number of pregnancies or births by the teen population, then multiplying by 1,000. 

For example, California's 1996 teen pregnancy rate of 125 per 1,000 means that out of every 1,000 teen girls living in California in 1996, 125 got pregnant that year.

What's the difference between a pregnancy rate and a birth rate?

The teen birth rate is lower than the teen pregnancy rate because birth rates only include those pregnancies that end in a live birth (57% of all teen pregnancies in 2000). The pregnancy rate, on the other hand, includes all pregnanciesthose ending in live births, abortions, and miscarriages.

I have a report that says the pregnancy rate is different than what you have posted on your website. Which one is correct?

It's likely that both are correct, they just come from different data sets. This could be for one of two reasons. 

First, three different national organizations release pregnancy rates: the Guttmacher Institute, the National Center for Health Statistics (part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), and the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (also part of CDC). Pregnancy rates from these three organizations are different, even when they reflect the same year and geographic area. 

Second, some states also publish pregnancy and birth rates. State published teen pregnancy rates, in particular, tend to be very different than state rates published by any of the national data sources. Abortion rates tend to be slightly lower, usually include only late-term miscarriages, and often use different age groups than do the national data sets. These three factors together can make rates from state health departments as much as 50-67% lower than state rates from AGI.

How do I cite online fact sheets from The National Campaign?

Most of our fact sheets do not have a specific author. For these documents, use our organization name as the author. For example, for the fact sheet Fast Facts: Unplanned Pregnancy Among 20-Somethings:

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (2008). Fast Facts: Unplanned Pregnancy Among 20-Somethings. [Online]. Available: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/fast-facts-unplanned-am.... Washington: Author.

If a document is undated, you can assume it was written (or updated) in the current year. For the proper citation in a specific style such as APA or MLA, please consult a style manual or textbook.

Can I get someone from The National Campaign to speak at my conference?

Visit The National Campaign Speakers Bureau to submit your request for National Campaign staff to speak at conferences, workshops, and meetings. We will respond to your request as soon as possible.

Does The National Campaign have an annual conference?

The short answer is no, The National Campaign does not have an annual conference. 

However, over the course of any given year, we generally host a variety of events: conferences, roundtable discussions, workshops, national teleconferences, seminars in Washington, DC, where we are headquartered, or online events.
The best way to stay informed of National Campaign events is to join our Notification Network.

Can I get an internship with The National Campaign?

The National Campaign hires interns during the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Check the Job Announcements page for more information.

Does The National Campaign endorse abstinence-only or comprehensive sex education?

In the battle between abstinence education and comprehensive education, The National Campaign is firmly on the side of science. In 1996, The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy was formed to help address the alarming rate of teen pregnancy in America. From the outset, The National Campaign knew that to make a dent in this problem, it had to be a non-partisan, non-ideological organization that could bridge the fundamental and meaningful value disagreements that exist on the issue. 

The National Campaign publishes research on the fundamental question: What programs/curricula have the best evidence of success? As we have noted in several publications, at present, those programs that discuss both abstinence and the importance of sexually active teens using contraception consistently and carefully have the best evidence of success. See Emerging Answers 2007 and What Works.

It is also the case that the majority of the American public do not view abstinence and contraception as competing strategies, but instead as complimentary strategies. See With One Voice. To read more about what the Campaign thinks on this issue, review our Thoughts on Abstinence fact sheet.

I'm from a country other than the United States. Where can I find information on teen pregnancy in my country?

The National Campaign's goal is to reduce teen and unplanned pregnancy rates in the U.S., so we do not do much work internationally. However, we do have a few resources. 

Our fact sheet section on Race & Ethnicity provides sources for international statistics.
For more resources, try using a search engine such as Google and typing in "teen pregnancy prevention" or "teen pregnancy statistics" or "unplanned pregnancy prevention" plus your country's name.