Progress is Not Victory: U.S Teen Pregnancy Rates Still Highest in Industrialized World: May is National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month

May 03 2017

(Washington, DC)—Despite historic declines in teen pregnancy rates over that last two decades, eight in 10 people in the United States still consider teen pregnancy to be an important issue as compared to other social and economic challenges in their community. New polling released today by The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy also suggests that nearly three-quarters (73%) of adults believe that more efforts should be made to prevent teen pregnancy in their communities. 

“Despite extraordinary declines in teen pregnancy and childbearing, nearly one in four teens still get pregnant by age 20 and the progress we have made remains uneven. Teens living in poverty are disproportionately more likely to experience an unplanned pregnancy, as are African-American and Latina teens,” said Ginny Ehrlich, CEO of The National Campaign. “The National Campaign stands ready to take on the challenges and is committed to ensuring that young people have the support they need to determine if, when, and under what circumstances to get pregnant.”

May is National Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month, a time for teens and adults alike to focus their attention on topics like birth control, healthy relationships, and sex. Throughout the month of May teens and their parents are encouraged to visit www.StayTeen.org to play a brand new interactive game and take the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Quiz, both released on May 1. For additional Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month resources and ways to get involved, visit our TPP Month web portal.

About The National Campaign: The National Campaign is a private, non-partisan, non-profit organization that seeks to improve the lives and future prospects of children and families by preventing teen and unplanned pregnancy. Please visit us at www.TheNationalCampaign.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

About the Survey: Data presented here are drawn from a national web survey, written by The National Campaign and conducted using Google Surveys, April 2017. Interviews were conducted among 2,314 respondents who volunteered to participate in Google online surveys and polls, and data are subsequently weighted to reflect the demographic composition of men and women ages 18 and older who are internet users. Google’s reports state a margin of error of +/- 2.1% at the 95% confidence level, which provides a helpful indication of the variability in these results; however, we note that because the sample is based on those who initially self-selected for participation, this estimate rests on a specific set of statistical assumptions about the selected sample, rather than the standard methodology for random probability sampling.