Education and Teen Pregnancy

June 07, 2012

Education

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In 2008, births to teens who lived in counties and cities where 25 persistently low-achieving schools are located accounted for 16 percent of all teen births in the United States, according to a new report released today by The National Campaign. These same 25 school districts also accounted for 20 percent of all high school drop outs in the United States and are home to many of the nation's lowest-performing high schools, often referred to as "dropout factories," where only 60 percent or fewer of students graduate on time.

The new report, produced in collaboration with America's Promise Alliance, underscores the clear link between teen pregnancy and dropping out of school and highlights what a number of communities across the United States are doing to directly confront these issues. With the help of school districts, public agencies, and community-based organizations, these communities--from California to New York and Texas to Tennessee--are using innovative strategies and activities to help students avoid pregnancy and complete their high school education.

"We are heartened by the work being done in communities across the U.S. to highlight the close connection between preventing teen pregnancy and educational attainment," said Sarah Brown, CEO of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. "We encourage school leaders, policymakers, state and local officials, business leaders, and others to collaborate and develop novel strategies like those highlighted in this report to help young people avoid pregnancy and complete their high school education."

"The connection between teen pregnancy and dropout rates is a no-brainer," said John Gomperts, president and CEO, America's Promise Alliance. "What this report does is reinforce the importance of focusing on those school districts and communities where the dropout problem is the greatest. By turning around those communities that are struggling the most we won't just see fewer dropouts and teen parents--we'll see a stronger economy, more vibrant communities, and a more hopeful nation."

Authored by: Bill Albert

Bill Albert is the Chief Program Officer of The National Campaign. As Chief Program Officer, Bill is responsible for overall program planning and development, and for tracking program progress. In addition, Bill provides oversight to the Campaign’s media outreach and communication strategies, as well as the writing, editing, design, and production of Campaign’s numerous publications and materials. In addition, he oversees the Campaign’s popular, award-winning websites, the National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, the organization’s work with new media, and the Campaign’s marketing efforts.

Before his work with The National Campaign, Bill spent 12 years working in television news, most recently as the Managing Editor at Fox Television News in Washington, DC. His responsibilities included managing the editorial content of two daily news broadcasts, assigning, editing, and writing stories for air, conducting interviews, and overseeing the work of reporters and electronic news gathering crews.

Bill received his degree in Communications at American University and resides in Kensington, Maryland with his wife, Carol. His perfect 21-year-old son, Harrison The Boy Wonder, is a senior at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD to its friends).

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